Association Picnic 2017

picnic

The Association Picnic will be Sunday, August 27 at Antioch Park. . There will be a swap starting around 8 am, lunch will be around noon, and then the auction will be sometime after lunch. Please bring a side dish or dessert, stuff to swap if you want to swap, and cash so you can buy something at the auction. Proceeds go to the Scholarship Fund.

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1917 Geologic Maps

kansas city missouri geologic mapShow-Me Rockhounds member Dan Snow has provided these geologic maps of Kansas City from 1917 which contain topographical, geological, and cross-sectional data. The maps show where to find several different types of rocks common to this area. They are also a great way to see how Jackson County has changed in the last 100 years. The maps are in PDF format and are very high resolution, so please zoom in!

Cross Sections (21 MB)
Jackson County (55 MB)
Kansas City (53 MB)

Cuprosklodowskite

This is from the Musonoi Extension mine, near Kolwezi, Shaba Province, Zaire, from the collection of Michael Scott. The Rruff Project used single-crystal X-ray diffraction to confirm the identity of the cuprosklodowskite. It is basically Sklodowskite (named after Marie Sklodowska Curie) that contains copper.

More info: http://rruff.info/cuprosklodowskite/display=default/

Missouri Mines Swap

Missouri Mines Rock Swap June 2017 mineral auction Park Hills Next weekend (June 10, 2017) we are going on a trip to the Missouri Mines Rock Swap in Park Hills, Missouri. We will look for drusy quartz and possibly Missouri banded agates. The swap itself goes from June 9-11 if you want to stay longer and is located at the Missouri Mines Historic Site near St. Joe State Park, 4000 MO-32, Park Hills, Missouri 63601. FREE admission to the show!

Directions: From Missouri 32, get off at Federal Mill Rd and look for the Missouri Mines Historic Site. Google Maps

Mini Field Trip May 2017

At the end of our meeting on May 20, 2017, David said, “Hey, we should go to [redacted] to get some fossils. It’s really close by.” Several members came along and looked for fossils.

Climbing and finding fossils in Missouri

Dan, David, and Connie climbing up to the good spot. Photo by Stephanie Reed

We had to climb a little bit to get to the good spot, but once we did, there were crinoid stems, brachiopods, encrusting and branching bryozoa, and other things. It was easy to get fossils out of the ground because it had recently rained. Afterward, David suggested another place nearby to go to find composita, so some people came along for that, too.

People climbing and finding fossils in Missouri, looking for fossils

Rock climbing in the “wilderness”. Photo by Stephanie Reed

In the summer weather, we expect to go on more spontaneous field trips like this in the Kansas City area. Make sure you come to our meetings dressed for adventure* if you want to come along!

*dressed for adventure= long pants, closed toe shoes, bring gloves and bug spray

Update: We took another mini field trip in July.

Cave Formations Show Evidence of Fire

stalactites inside a cave

Drip water in Yonderup Cave contains evidence of an aboveground fire. Credit: Andy Baker/U. New South Wales

Stalactites and stalagmites form in caves when water that contains dissolved minerals (such as calcium carbonate) drips from the ceiling. Scientists can analyze the 18O/16O ratios (isotopes of oxygen) in the stalactites and see how the temperature changed as they were formed. A team led by Andy Baker, Gurinder Nagra, and Pauline C. Treble of the University of New South Wales, Australia discovered that Yonderup Cave had a lot more 18O than they expected. Since having more 18O is associated with higher temperatures at the time of formation[1], it could have been interpreded as one of the largest climate changes in the last 2 million years.

But, there was a wildfire in 2005 and a large tree died right on top of the cave. Baker’s team believes that this is what actually caused the increased 18O concentration. This is important for anybody else trying to use these oxygen isotopes to determine ancient temperatures, because if they get a very warm result it might have been caused by a forest fire instead.

[1]It’s a little more complicated than that. Read the whole article here: http://cen.acs.org/articles/94/i30/Cave-dripwater-contain-fire-evidence.html and check Baker’s website for more interesting stuff about how he researches caves to learn about past climates.

Cabbing with the Snows

A while ago, we went over to Mr. and Mrs. Snow’s house and learned how to make cabs. Dan provided the equipment and Connie provided a delicious lunch and took photos so I would have something to write about. Everyone had a lot of fun.

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Dan demonstrating how to use a flat lap. Photo by Connie Snow

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Everyone working hard. Photo by Connie Snow

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Jim and Jeanna working. Photo by Connie Snow

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Two people working on the same machine! We even had three people at one point. Photo by Connie Snow

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Stephanie polishing her cab. This was her first time ever! Photo by David Reed

reed-cabs

Stephanie’s jasper and David’s green goldstone completed cabs. Photo by David Reed

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Martin working. Photo by Connie Snow

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Dan, Burt, and Charley discussing something, David shaping. Photo by Connie Snow

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Jeanna and Jim proud of their work. Photo by Connie Snow

 

 

Carborundum

iridescent purple and green silicon carbide

In Mark Sherwood’s case at the Spring 2017 show. Photo by Stephanie Reed

At Mark Sherwood’s talk “Earth Science… Facts, Frauds and Scams” he mentioned carborundum (also spelled carborundrum). It is made of silicon carbide, but it is not a natural mineral that you can find in the ground. If you want to find some carborundum, look in a chimney. At an iron foundry, the carbon and silicon in the smoke rise and precipitate on the inside of the chimney. When the chimney is cleaned, they find these nice silicon carbide deposits. They are iridescent and pretty enough to buy, but don’t be fooled. Some sellers will say that carborundrum or moissanite and pretend like it is from some secret mine or even a meteorite, but it is really a man-made mineral.

Note: Moissanite is a naturally occurring silicon carbide, but it is very rare and it doesn’t look like the specimen pictured above. It actually looks like tiny green glass crystals. They are usually heat treated to increase clarity. If so, the seller needs to disclose that the specimen has been heated or they are being fraudulent. Buyer beware.